COVID-19: Please visit our resources page for updates.

Preservation | Family Wealth Protection & Planning

Subscribe

Blog Editors

Topics

Archives

By Keith Grissom, Jennifer Davis, Elizabeth Pack on August 12, 2020 at 12:00 PM

This is the fifth installment in a blog series on opportunities for tax planning in the current low-interest rate environment. Read our previous installments here. Future installments will cover installment sales to defective grantor trusts and charitable giving.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By Keith Grissom, Jennifer Davis, Elizabeth Pack on August 4, 2020 at 3:00 PM

This is the fourth installment in a blog series on opportunities for tax planning in the current low-interest rate environment. Read our previous installments here. Future installments will cover family limited partnerships and limited liability companies, installment sales to defective grantor trusts, and charitable giving.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By Keith Grissom, Jennifer Davis, Elizabeth Pack on July 27, 2020 at 3:00 PM

This is the third installment in a seven-part blog series on opportunities for tax planning in the current low-interest rate environment. Read our previous installments here. Future installments will cover creating Grantor Retained Annuity Trusts, family limited partnerships and limited liability companies, installment sales to defective grantor trusts, and charitable giving.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By Jennifer Davis, Betty Schaefer on July 23, 2020 at 4:00 PM

For the parents of students entering college this fall, there are some unique challenges in store. In navigating all the changes related to the pandemic’s effect on college students, it’s possible you are missing one of the most important items: Having your child sign durable powers of attorney.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By Keith Grissom, Jennifer Davis, Elizabeth Pack on July 20, 2020 at 3:00 PM

This is the second installment in a blog series on opportunities for tax planning in the current low-interest rate environment. Read our overview in Part 1 here. Future installments will cover making or refinancing loans, creating Grantor Retained Annuity Trusts, family limited partnerships and limited liability companies, installment sales to defective grantor trusts, and charitable giving.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By Jennifer Davis, Nina Windsor on July 15, 2020 at 11:00 AM

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced many people to think pragmatically about the possibility that they or their loved ones might fall ill. Having an estate plan in place can ensure that your wishes are honored and your loved ones are taken care of in the event of your incapacity or death.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By Keith Grissom, Jennifer Davis, Elizabeth Pack, Nina Windsor on July 13, 2020 at 5:00 PM

This is the first in a blog series on opportunities for tax planning in the current uncertain, low-interest rate environment. Future installments will cover one-time and annual gifting, making or refinancing loans, creating Grantor Retained Annuity Trusts, family limited partnerships and limited liability companies, installment sales to defective grantor trusts, and charitable giving.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By Jennifer Davis, Nina Windsor on July 2, 2020 at 1:00 PM

*This publication has been updated to reflect recent IRS guidance.

Although many aspects of the CARES Act focus on relief for small businesses and employees, there are several provisions that are relevant to estate planning.  These provisions may influence planning decisions this year and in the future, including those related to charitable giving and retirement plans.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By Nina Windsor on May 28, 2020 at 12:00 PM

The IRS has posted an Economic Impact Payment Information Center that addresses many frequently asked questions regarding the stimulus payments authorized by the CARES Act. However, like many things related to the act, there are remaining questions and gray areas not contemplated by the act or fully addressed at this time by the IRS. One of these questions is how to address the receipt of a payment for a deceased individual.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By Hunter Rouse on April 9, 2020 at 2:00 PM

Due to the outbreak of COVID-19, many Missourians are finding it difficult to carry on a modicum of “business as usual.” One of the many difficulties is the requirement that certain legal documents, including deeds, deeds of trust (mortgages), wills and powers of attorney, must be validated through personal appearance before a notary public (and in some cases witnesses) to meet certain requirements or to be effective. Even though most real estate documents will remain enforceable even in the absence of effective notarization, individuals should endeavor to notarize such documents to avoid potential litigation. However, applicable shelter-in-place or stay-at-home orders have made it difficult, if not impossible, to have anything notarized in a safe, social-distancing-mindful way.

In light of these concerns, on April 6, 2020, Missouri Gov. Mike Parson issued Executive Order 20-08, which purports to suspend the requirement of personal appearance to have a document notarized. Instead, the order permits notarization of documents through a videoconference (FaceTime, Zoom, Skype and other such video chats), provided certain requirements are met.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email

This website uses cookies to improve functionality and performance. If you choose to continue browsing this website, you consent to the use of cookies. Read our Privacy Policy here for details.