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By T. Christopher Bailey on August 7, 2019 at 12:30 PM

Woman's arms protecting a drawing of money on a chalkboard from question marksUnder a new law set to take effect September 29, 2019, Illinois employers will be prohibited from, among other things, asking for an employee’s wage history during the hiring process. The law, which amends the Illinois Equal Pay Act, is designed with the intent of avoiding future pay disparity between men and women based on prior wage differences.

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By Daniel Ritter on July 29, 2019 at 10:15 AM

"IL LEGAL" spelled out with wooden blocks, representing marijuana or weed being legalized in Illinois.Starting on Jan. 1, 2020, Illinois residents and visitors over age 21 are allowed to purchase, possess, use, or transport cannabis for recreational purposes. Illinois’ legalization of recreational cannabis under state law will impact Illinois and Missouri employers because the drug will be more accessible to their employees.

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By Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming, Lauren Harris on January 18, 2019 at 10:10 AM

"2018" written out with wooden blocks with a person rotating the "8" to a "9"2018 was a relatively quiet year in federal employment law developments, but the stage is set for a much more active 2019. Below is a summary of major federal employment law headlines and a look at what employers can expect in 2019.

For Missouri and Illinois employers, a review of 2018 state updates and a look forward at 2019 can be found here.

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By Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming, Lauren Harris on January 18, 2019 at 9:56 AM

Missouri & Illinois state capitals, side by side with the words "New laws Missouri and Illinois employers should know" overlayedEmployers in Missouri and Illinois saw the passage of several new employment-related laws in 2018. Below is a look at some legislative highlights of 2018 and how they might affect your business in 2019.

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By the Employment & Labor Practice Group on August 8, 2018 at 9:25 AM

A piece of paper shows someone chose to vote "no."On Aug. 7, 2018, Missouri residents voted by a 2 to 1 margin against Proposition A, which would have made Missouri a right-to-work state.

The ballot measure asked voters whether they wished to enact Senate Bill 19, which the state legislature passed and former Gov. Eric Greitens signed last year. If enacted, that bill would have prohibited “employers from requiring employees to join or refrain from joining a labor organization, requiring employees to pay any money to a labor organization, or requiring employees to pay any charity or third party the equivalent of money required to be paid by members of a labor organization.”

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By Dennis Collins on May 18, 2018 at 10:50 AM

Person casting a vote on a ballotThe Missouri legislature has approved a proposal that moves the date of a public vote on the state’s right-to-work law to the August 2018 ballot.

The proposal was approved 96-47 in the Missouri House on May 17. The Senate had already passed the measure. The legislative approval moves a statewide vote on whether to prevent the Missouri right-to-work law from taking effect from November to the Aug. 7 primary ballot. 

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By Dennis Collins on May 10, 2018 at 11:10 AM

Picture of Missouri State Capitol BuildingOn May 8, 2018, a Missouri Senate committee approved a proposal to have voters decide in August 2018, rather than November 2018, whether to prevent the Missouri right-to-work law from taking effect. If allowed to become effective, the right-to-work law would prohibit employers from requiring employees to join a union or pay union dues as a condition of employment.

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By Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming, Lauren Harris, Camille Toney, Audrie Howard on February 8, 2018 at 2:50 PM

Missouri and Illinois highlighted in red on a map.Employers in Missouri and Illinois saw the passage of several new employment-related laws in 2017. Below is a look at some legislative highlights of 2017 and how they might affect your business in 2018.

Missouri employment laws

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By Lauren Daming on September 7, 2017 at 11:34 AM

White turnaround arrow on a brick wall, showing a reversal in a decision.Over the summer, the Missouri legislature took action to invalidate or cut back two ordinances passed by the city of St. Louis, causing the city’s minimum wage to revert to the statewide minimum of $7.70 per hour and making it unlawful for cities to adopt laws that would interfere with the free-speech rights of any “alternative to abortion agency” (e.g., a pregnancy resource center) or employees with objections to abortion.

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By Lauren Harris on August 28, 2017 at 3:29 PM

Image of the words "What's next?" written on a piece of paperThis summer, Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens signed into law Senate Bill 43, which substantially changes the way the Missouri Human Rights Act (MHRA) will be administered and interpreted. The MHRA’s core purpose is to prohibit employers from basing employment decisions on a person’s race, color, religion, national origin, sex, ancestry, age or disability, and it prohibits retaliation for engaging in protected activities covered under the act.

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