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By Scott Cruz on March 25, 2021 at 4:15 PM

On March 23, 2021, Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed into law Senate Bill 1480, the Employee Background Fairness Act. This impacts Illinois employers because it imposes new obligations under the Illinois Human Rights Act (IHRA) on the way they can use criminal convictions to assess employment eligibility for applicants and current employees. It also imposes new reporting and registration requirements concerning employee demographics under the Illinois Business Corporation Act (IBCA) and the Illinois Equal Pay Act (IEPA) and creates new whistleblower anti-retaliation protections under the IEPA.

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By Scott Cruz on March 17, 2021 at 3:45 PM

On March 11, 2021, President Biden signed into law the American Rescue Plan Act (ARP). Among its many provisions, the ARP addresses paid sick and family leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), and payroll tax credits for providing such paid leave.

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By Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming on January 8, 2021 at 12:30 PM

In a year marked by federal responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, federal agencies managed to finalize some non-pandemic legal developments in 2020: the Department of Labor’s (DOL) new overtime rule and joint employer test both went into effect, and the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) overturned a handful of Obama-era precedents. With Joe Biden’s election as president in November 2020, the coming four years will likely bring some reversal of the impact of the Trump administration, particularly on the DOL and NLRB. The 2019-2020 Supreme Court term was relatively busy for employment, including a major development for Title VII. Of course, much of the energy and resources of the federal agencies overseeing employment laws were spent on providing guidance to employers related to COVID-19 issues. Below is a summary of major federal employment law headlines from last year and a look at what employers can expect in 2021.

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By Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming on January 8, 2021 at 12:30 PM

In a year dominated by the pandemic, 2021 updates to Missouri and Illinois law are overshadowed by COVID-19’s impact and related federal employment law developments. Illinois’ treatment of July as the new January adds to the relatively quiet start to 2021 while the state adapts to its new employment laws that went into effect July 1, 2020.

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By Scott Cruz on June 16, 2020 at 5:00 PM

The Chicago Fair Workweek Ordinance goes into effect on July 1, 2020, and has the potential to cause headaches for some organizations that have employees working in Chicago. Here’s a look at what employers in seven key industries - building services, health care, hotels, manufacturing, restaurants, retail, and warehouse services - need to know about the ordinance.

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By Lauren Harris on April 10, 2020 at 3:00 PM

On April 9, 2020, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued its updated Technical Assistance Questions and Answers titled “What You Should Know About COVID-19 and the ADA, the Rehabilitation Act, and Other EEO Laws” addressing several questions that have arisen since the beginning of this national emergency and reminding us that even during a pandemic, employers need to be cognizant of their obligations under the ADA and other EEO laws. A summary of the questions and answers is provided below.

A more comprehensive guide from the EEOC can be found in “Pandemic Preparedness in the Workplace and the Americans With Disabilities Act,” which was drafted during the prior H1N1 outbreak and last revised on March 21, 2020, to address COVID-19.

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By Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming on January 22, 2020 at 10:15 AM

Map showing Illinois and Missouri highlightedWhile Missouri employers saw few legislative updates that will affect the state of employment law in 2020, the Illinois legislature had a busy year. Below is a look at some of the legislative highlights of 2019 and how they might affect your business in 2020.

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By Marcus Wilbers on March 25, 2013 at 3:24 PM

Man with smartphone in business buildingThe Northern District of Illinois recently certified* a class action in a case alleging that employers should pay overtime wages for time employees spend checking their e-mail after hours. The police officer who sued the city of Chicago claims the Police Department had an “unwritten policy” requiring officers to check their BlackBerry after normal working hours without compensation. Checking their BlackBerry, the officer claimed, constituted substantive police work and the department would have been significantly less successful in accomplishing its goals without regular required BlackBerry use.

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