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By Lauren Daming on March 25, 2020 at 10:40 AM

Magnifying glass looking at detailsThe Department of Labor (DOL) on March 24, 2020, released its first guidance explaining aspects of paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). The DOL released fact sheets aimed at both employees and employers as well as a Q&A document and promised more guidance to come. The guidance discusses how employers and employees can “take advantage of the protections and relief” offered by the FFCRA’s Paid Sick Leave Act and Emergency Family and Medical Expanded Leave Act.

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By Daniel Ritter on March 25, 2020 at 8:00 PM

FFCRA posterOn March 18, 2020, President Trump signed legislation extending to certain employees paid sick time related to COVID-19 and paid leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). As part of the legislation, employers must display the Department of Labor (DOL) poster notifying employees of their rights under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). On March 25, 2020, the DOL published two posters, for federal and non-federal employers.

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By Jay Nathanson, Cassie Barr on March 20, 2020 at 2:20 PM

Tax buttons on calculatorThe Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the “Act”) recently signed into law includes, among other things, provisions for required paid sick and paid family and medical leave (see our previous blog post here). The Act is intended to alleviate some of the economic burden the coronavirus has imposed on workers by mandating certain paid leave. The Act additionally alleviates the economic burdens being imposed on employers by providing certain tax benefits to employers making payments required under the Act. 

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By Amy Blaisdell on March 19, 2020 at 12:15 AM

Sick Leave Law bookPresident Trump has signed legislation extending to certain employees paid sick time related to the coronavirus and paid leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”). 

As covered in a previous post, the U.S. House of Representatives last weekend passed a previous version of the bill. In the days since, the House revised the legislation to update several of the provisions. The Senate passed the legislation on March 18 with a 90-8 vote. The President has now signed the legislation.

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By Amy Blaisdell on March 18, 2020 at 3:45 PM

U.S. CapitolCongress has passed legislation on extending employees' paid leave related to the coronavirus and expanding the FMLA, sending the bill to President Trump for his signature. 

As covered in a previous post, the U.S. House of Representatives last weekend passed a previous version of the bill. In the days since, the House had revised the legislation to update several of the provisions. The Senate passed the legislation on March 18 on a 90-8 vote.

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By Daniel Ritter on March 17, 2020 at 2:00 PM

Records fileOSHA requires that covered employers record certain work-related illnesses on their OSHA 300 log. On March 10, 2020, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) provided guidance on the recording of COVID-19. However, this guidance did not consider three key issues:

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By Scott Cruz on March 16, 2020 at 12:00 PM

The coronavirus outbreak known as COVID-19 has been spreading around the world, including the United States. Employers must respond in rapid fashion and face a series of questions regarding the impact the virus will have on the workplace. Below are answers to various questions all companies must know.

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By Amy Blaisdell on March 16, 2020 at 10:20 AM

Over the Weekend: The U.S. House of Representatives (with President Trump’s “full support”) passed legislation that would:  (1) Extend paid leave related to the coronavirus, (2) Expand the FMLA to provide paid leave to employees for coronavirus-related reasons, and (3) Expand the availability of unemployment funds. This legislation still requires U.S. Senate approval.

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February 10, 2020 at 3:00 PM

Image of interior of hospital showing empty hospital bedsIn an article titled “Quick tips for employers as coronavirus outbreak continues,” Greensfelder attorney Amy Blaisdell discusses the steps employers can take as a precaution when dealing with sick employees. From the article:

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By Daniel Ritter, Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming on January 22, 2020 at 10:15 AM

2020 review concept. Hand flip wood cube change year 2019 to 2020 and the word REVIEW on wooden block on wood tableThe theme for last year’s federal developments was reversal of Obama-era rules. The Department of Labor and National Labor Relations Board were especially active in this respect.

After a relatively quiet Supreme Court term for employment law in 2018-19, the stage is set for the court to rule in 2020 on highly anticipated topics. Below is a summary of major federal employment law headlines from last year and a look at what employers can expect in 2020.

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