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By Amy Blaisdell, Camille Toney on January 12, 2018 at 4:15 PM

Words "NEW RULES" spelled out with block letters on a table.In a surprising move, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced that the Final Rule, changing the claims procedure for ERISA- governed disability plans, will become effective on April 1, 2018. The DOL previously delayed the Jan. 1, 2018 effective date to allow additional time for comments and data submissions and to give the DOL time to amend or rescind the Final Rule. In a press statement released on Jan. 5, 2018, the DOL stated that while it received numerous complaints about the New Rule, only a few of them provided substantive criticism. 

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By Katherine Fechte, Camille Toney on January 12, 2018 at 3:50 PM

Stack of envelopesOn January 5, 2018, the Department of Labor (DOL) Wage and Hour Division reissued 17 opinion letters to shed light on the DOL’s stance on numerous issues under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Under the administration of President George W. Bush, the DOL issued 36 opinion letters, many of which were recalled under President Barack Obama in early 2009. A year later in 2010, the Wage and Hour Division announced it would no longer issue opinion letters in response to employer and business questions about wage and hour issues under the FLSA.

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By Lauren Daming on January 10, 2018 at 11:35 AM

Employee clocking in with fingerprintA wave of class action lawsuits has been filed alleging violations of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA), a statute aimed at regulating how companies use information based on “biometric identifiers” such as fingerprints and retina scans. Violating BIPA can be costly, so employers operating within Illinois should review their business practices to determine whether they are using “biometric information” and plan accordingly.

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By Audrie Howard, Katherine Fechte on December 15, 2017 at 11:00 AM EDT

Sign shows reverse directionThe National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) on Dec. 14, 2017, overturned significant prior precedent related to its position governing workplace policies and handbooks and its joint employer standard. These decisions are significant because they reversed two previous standards that had caused numerous headaches for employers.

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By Katherine Fechte on December 11, 2017 at 4:25 PM

Elevated view of a restaurant bill and money, showing a tip. The Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor (DOL) recently proposed a rule affecting tip regulations under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Under the rule proposed Dec. 4, 2017, establishments can implement tip pools, or require servers and workers who earn tips to share with those, such as line cooks and dishwashers, who do not.

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By Amy Blaisdell, Audrie Howard, Jill Luft on November 10, 2017 at 10:52 AM

"ADA, Americans with Disabilities Act" written on a piece of paper with a pencil and stethoscope on top.A recent Seventh Circuit case held that additional leave beyond what is otherwise required by leave entitlement laws is not a reasonable accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act. This holding provides important guidance for employers. Continue reading for the details of this case and our recommended best practices in light of its holding.

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By Amy Blaisdell, Camille Toney on October 12, 2017 at 4:17 PM

Word "delay" written on a clockTaking a page from the fiduciary rule playbook, today the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) proposed a 90-day delay of the implementation of the amended ERISA claims procedure rule for employer-sponsored disability plans (“Final Rule”). The Final Rule was scheduled to take effect for ERISA disability benefits claims on January 1, 2018. The proposed delay would postpone the Final Rule’s application to April 1, 2018, giving the DOL time to decide whether to amend, modify or rescind the Final Rule.

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By Audrie Howard on September 19, 2017 at 11:14 AM

Red stop sign with the word "The Flu" shown on a white sign below itWith flu season right around the corner, employers may be starting to wonder what steps can be taken to ensure that the workplace remains productive and flu-free. Here are answers to some common questions about what employers can and cannot do with regard to flu shots for employees, as well as our recommendations for some best practices.

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By Lauren Daming on September 7, 2017 at 11:34 AM

White turnaround arrow on a brick wall, showing a reversal in a decision.Over the summer, the Missouri legislature took action to invalidate or cut back two ordinances passed by the city of St. Louis, causing the city’s minimum wage to revert to the statewide minimum of $7.70 per hour and making it unlawful for cities to adopt laws that would interfere with the free-speech rights of any “alternative to abortion agency” (e.g., a pregnancy resource center) or employees with objections to abortion.

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By Lauren Daming on September 1, 2017 at 11:40 AM

Word "Overtime" written in white text with a red backrgoundA Texas district court judge struck down the Obama administration’s overtime rule on Aug. 31, 2017, finding that the Department of Labor (DOL) had exceeded its authority in adopting a new salary threshold that would have entitled an estimated 4.2 million workers to overtime compensation.

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