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NLRB Proposes Amendments to the Union Election Regulations
By Dennis Collins on February 12, 2014 at 6:00 PM

Vote red grunge stampOn February 5, 2014, the National Labor Relations Board announced proposed amendments to its regulations, which would make it easier for unions to organize employees. The proposed amendments would permit unions to hold workplace elections more quickly after filing an election petition. The majority of elections now take place 45 to 60 days after the union obtains necessary signatures to file a petition. It is estimated that the proposed amendments would shorten the time period by days or even weeks.

In addition to shortening the time period between the filing of a petition and an election, the proposed regulations would require employers to provide employees’ phone numbers and email addresses to the union before the vote. By requiring this personal information to be supplied by an employer, the regulations will make it easier for unions to contact and organize employees, and may also reverse the significant decline in union membership that has occurred in recent years.

Mark Pearce, the NLRB’s Chairman, announced that he would allow 60 days for public comment on the proposed amendments. Jay Timmons, President and CEO of the National Association of Manufacturers, has referred to the proposed election procedures as the “ambush election” rule. On the other hand, Richard Trumka, President of the AFL-CIO, called the proposed rules “an important step in the right direction.” He then noted that the current NLRB election process is riddled with delays and provides too many opportunities for employers to manufacture and drag-out the process through costly and unnecessary litigation that denies employees a vote.

We encourage you to write to the NLRB and to work with any of your associates to comment on the proposed amendments.

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