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By Lauren Daming on September 1, 2017 at 11:40 AM

Word "Overtime" written in white text with a red backrgoundA Texas district court judge struck down the Obama administration’s overtime rule on Aug. 31, 2017, finding that the Department of Labor (DOL) had exceeded its authority in adopting a new salary threshold that would have entitled an estimated 4.2 million workers to overtime compensation.

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By Katherine Fechte on August 8, 2017 at 2:15 PM

Blue binder with the word "overtime" on the side, on top of a deskThe U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) published a request for information (RFI) in late July seeking comments, data, ideas and information on an appropriate salary level for exempt employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

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By Katherine Fechte on May 19, 2017 at 10:30 AM

Image of timesheet showing someone working more than eight hoursThis month, the House of Representatives passed by a vote of 229-197 the Republican-backed overtime bill titled the Working Families Flexibility Act. The act would enable employees to choose taking “comp time” or paid time off work instead of receiving overtime pay when they work more than 40 hours in a week. Proponents of the bill say this will provide increased flexibility for workers who want to spend more time with their families, but critics believe it will weaken federal overtime protections and make it easier for employers to delay paying earned overtime wages.

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By Lauren Daming on January 30, 2017 at 9:53 AM

People joining in tug of war.Last week, 60 business groups and four states joined the fight against the Department of Labor’s new overtime rule by filing amicus briefs in the Fifth Circuit asking the court to uphold the district court’s injunction blocking the rule from taking effect.

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Business shoes moving from 2016 to 20172016 was a busy year for employment law developments on a national level, and 2017 promises to follow suit. To help employers navigate the changes, here is a summary of major developments that may affect your business this year.

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By Katherine Fechte on November 23, 2016 at 9:16 AM

Time and moneyThe uncertainty brewing over whether the U.S. Department of Labor’s new overtime rule would actually go into effect on Dec. 1, 2016, came to a halt on the afternoon of Nov. 22 when a Texas federal judge entered a nationwide injunction blocking the DOL from implementing its rule expanding overtime protections. 

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By Audrie Howard on November 17, 2016 at 3:48 PM

time and clocksAs employers are all aware, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL)’s new overtime rules are set to take effect Dec. 1, 2016. The rule, projected to cover some 4.2 million workers, will raise the minimum salary threshold for overtime exemption 101 percent from its current rate of $455 per week to $913 per week.

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By Katherine Fechte on September 29, 2016 at 11:54 AM

Businessman calling timeoutWith the Dec. 1, 2016, deadline for the Department of Labor (DOL) Final Overtime Rule approaching, employers across the country are urgently working to implement new compensation and classification practices. But recently, the DOL has been facing much criticism and resistance, as evidenced by a duo of federal lawsuits filed last week and a House vote to delay the rule’s implementation.

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By Katherine Fechte on September 22, 2016 at 9:30 AM

States involved in DOL lawsuitTwenty-one states have filed suit against the federal government seeking a preliminary and permanent injunction to block the Department of Labor’s new overtime rule and declare it unlawful.

In the 30-page complaint filed Sept. 20, 2016, the states allege that the Obama administration is trying to impose heavy costs and its own policy initiatives, in violation of the 10th Amendment to the Constitution. On March 13, 2014, President Barack Obama ordered the DOL to revise the Fair Labor Standards Act’s overtime exemption to account for the federal minimum wage. The DOL complied and released its final rule on May 18, 2016. 

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By Lauren Daming on May 18, 2016 at 1:52 PM

On May 18, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) released the final rule updating the regulations defining and limiting “white collar” overtime exemptions under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). These rules apply to workers who fall under the executive, administrative, or professional exemptions from the FLSA’s minimum wage and overtime protections. The rule will go into effect December 1, 2016, giving employers over six months to adjust.

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