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Posts in Absence, Leave and Disability Management.
By Katherine Fechte on July 27, 2018 at 12:10 PM

Businessman holding a baby. In an age when companies are more progressive than ever and employers are focused on keeping employees happy and healthy, employee benefits such as vacation days and paid leave are on the rise. Bloomberg reports that more than one in three U.S. employers now offers paid maternity leave beyond the amount required by law, up from one in six earlier this decade. Similarly, benefits such as paternity leave for new fathers and parental leave for new adoptive parents and same-sex couples have become more common.

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By Camille Toney on July 13, 2018 at 2:45 PM

Empty chairs in cubiclesLeave management is a common topic of conversation for HR professionals and employment specialists. Knowing the leave laws and the types of leave are just the tip of the iceberg in leave management. It takes a defined process to generally look at each leave request while taking each request on a case-by-case basis. Even with having a dedicated process for leaves, employers still need to remain attentive to ensure the process curtails risk and curbs potential leave abuse. Below are a few tips to help in the process. The two main federal leave laws, the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), are the focus of these tips. However, employers should keep in mind the other federal and state laws that may be implicated in the leave management process.

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By Jill Luft on April 12, 2018 at 9:50 AM

Words "Out of Office" written on a piece of paper held up by a businesswomanAs we reported last fall, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals determined that a multi-month continuous leave of absence is beyond the scope of a reasonable accommodation under the ADA. The case was Severson v. Heartland Woodcraft, Inc., 872 F.3d 476 (7th Cir. 2017). After exhausting 12 continuous weeks of FMLA leave for a serious back condition, Severson informed his employer that he would need to remain off work for another two to three months. The Seventh Circuit reasoned that the ADA is an antidiscrimination statute, not a medical leave entitlement, and an employee who needs long-term medical leave cannot work and is therefore not a qualified individual under the ADA.

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By Amy Blaisdell, Audrie Howard, Jill Luft on November 10, 2017 at 10:52 AM

"ADA, Americans with Disabilities Act" written on a piece of paper with a pencil and stethoscope on top.A recent Seventh Circuit case held that additional leave beyond what is otherwise required by leave entitlement laws is not a reasonable accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act. This holding provides important guidance for employers. Continue reading for the details of this case and our recommended best practices in light of its holding.

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By Audrie Howard, Camille Toney, Lauren Harris on January 26, 2017 at 3:57 PM

Shoes moving from 2016 to 2017 with pictures of Illinois and MissouriThe Missouri and Illinois legislatures were quite active in 2016 in creating laws affecting employers, and they have been just as busy in the first few weeks of 2017. Below is a summary of employment law developments that may affect your business in those states in the coming year. 

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By Katherine Fechte on October 28, 2016 at 2:15 PM

What to know before Election Day in Missouri and Illinois

"I voted" stickerElection Day, Nov. 8, is almost here, and employers should be ready for the questions employees may have about taking time off to vote. Additionally, employers should make sure any company policies comply with state laws concerning time off for voting.

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By Amy Blaisdell on May 14, 2013 at 9:43 AM

Employee using time clock to punching in/out of workLate last year the Seventh Circuit reversed prior precedent and held that an associate who is minimally qualified must be reassigned to a vacant position as a reasonable accommodation in EEOC v. United Airlines, Inc.. 2012 U.S. App. LEXIS 18804 (7th Cir. 2012). That decision, coupled with the EEOC's focus on fixed-leave policies as violating the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), has caused much angst among employers as they struggle to square lean staffing models with the ADA’s duty to accommodate.

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