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By Jill Luft, Lauren Harris on April 14, 2020 at 12:15 PM

Almost two weeks after the effective date of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), many employers are still not certain what information and documents they should obtain from employees who request emergency paid sick leave and/or expanded family and medical leave. To recap, there are six reasons an employee can take emergency paid sick leave.

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By Lauren Harris on April 10, 2020 at 3:00 PM

On April 9, 2020, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued its updated Technical Assistance Questions and Answers titled “What You Should Know About COVID-19 and the ADA, the Rehabilitation Act, and Other EEO Laws” addressing several questions that have arisen since the beginning of this national emergency and reminding us that even during a pandemic, employers need to be cognizant of their obligations under the ADA and other EEO laws. A summary of the questions and answers is provided below.

A more comprehensive guide from the EEOC can be found in “Pandemic Preparedness in the Workplace and the Americans With Disabilities Act,” which was drafted during the prior H1N1 outbreak and last revised on March 21, 2020, to address COVID-19.

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By Lauren Harris on April 2, 2020 at 10:45 AM

Unemployment spelled on wooden tilesAs claims for unemployment rise, Missouri and Illinois have eased the typical restrictions for unemployed workers to obtain benefits. Coupled with the Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation, which is being administered by the states, both employers and employees are seeing some relief during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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By Lauren Daming, Katherine Fechte, Lauren Harris, Jill Luft on April 2, 2020 at 4:30 PM

New Rules signOn April 1, 2020, the Department of Labor released a temporary rule issuing regulations under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) effective immediately through December 31, 2020. Employers who have been wrestling with compliance with the FFCRA’s paid leave provisions will recognize much of the material in these regulations from the DOL’s informal guidance or from the CARES Act’s amendments to the FFCRA*. The regulations also include some helpful clarification:

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By Lauren Harris on May 3, 2019 at 12:30 PM

Hundred dollar bills laying on top of a calendarAs we explained last week, a federal judge recently ruled that all employers who are required to submit EEO-1 surveys must report 2018 employee pay data by Sept. 30, 2019. In that ruling, the court also ordered the EEOC to collect a second year of pay data and gave the agency a choice between collecting employers’ 2017 data with the 2018 pay data or waiting to collect 2019 pay data next year. 

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By Lauren Harris on April 25, 2019 at 2:50 PM

Magnifying glass on dollar banknotes. A federal judge reportedly ruled April 25 that all employers who are required to submit EEO-1 surveys on employee demographic data must report employee pay data by Sept. 30, 2019.  This includes employers with at least 100 employees and federal contractors with at least 50 employees and a contract of $50,000 or more with the federal government. 

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By Lauren Harris on April 4, 2019 at 9:20 AM

Three links of a chain, with the middle one being blue and the left and right one being silverOn April 1, 2019, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) offered a simplified test in a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to determine whether two entities should be considered joint employers under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The FLSA provides that two entities can be jointly and severally responsible for an employee’s wages, and thus the potential FLSA violations of either entity, if they function as joint employers. The notice sets out that the employment relationship should be determined based on a balance of four factors, specifically, whether a potential joint employer actually exercises the power to:

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By Lauren Daming, Lauren Harris on January 31, 2019 at 11:50 AM

Work desk with dirty tissues, a coffee mug, and a sign on the computer that says "Sick Leave"For employers, flu season is a great time for a checkup – not with your doctor, but with your policies and procedures related to employee sick leave. Below are some common questions employers may have about how to handle employee sick leave during this flu season.

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By Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming, Lauren Harris on January 18, 2019 at 10:10 AM

"2018" written out with wooden blocks with a person rotating the "8" to a "9"2018 was a relatively quiet year in federal employment law developments, but the stage is set for a much more active 2019. Below is a summary of major federal employment law headlines and a look at what employers can expect in 2019.

For Missouri and Illinois employers, a review of 2018 state updates and a look forward at 2019 can be found here.

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By Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming, Lauren Harris on January 18, 2019 at 9:56 AM

Missouri & Illinois state capitals, side by side with the words "New laws Missouri and Illinois employers should know" overlayedEmployers in Missouri and Illinois saw the passage of several new employment-related laws in 2018. Below is a look at some legislative highlights of 2018 and how they might affect your business in 2019.

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