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By Katherine Fechte on November 12, 2018 at 3:50 PM

Restaurant bill with tip moneyOn Nov. 8, 2018, the Department of Labor (DOL) issued an Opinion Letter reviving its 2009 guidance that eliminated the 80/20 rule for tipped workers. The rule prohibited employers and businesses from paying tipped workers below the minimum wage by way of a tip credit for non-tipped work when such work comprised more than 20 percent of their day. Under the Obama administration, the 2009 Opinion Letter was withdrawn, which restored the 80/20 rule and sparked a flurry of lawsuits alleging that tipped workers spend more than 20 percent of their time performing non-tipped work for which they did not receive the minimum wage. After finding the rule was confusing and nearly unworkable, the DOL has done away with it once again.

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By Katherine Fechte on July 27, 2018 at 12:10 PM

Businessman holding a baby. In an age when companies are more progressive than ever and employers are focused on keeping employees happy and healthy, employee benefits such as vacation days and paid leave are on the rise. Bloomberg reports that more than one in three U.S. employers now offers paid maternity leave beyond the amount required by law, up from one in six earlier this decade. Similarly, benefits such as paternity leave for new fathers and parental leave for new adoptive parents and same-sex couples have become more common.

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By Katherine Fechte on April 4, 2018 at 9:50 AM

Person receiving car keys from a car salesmanOn April 2, 2018, the U.S. Supreme Court, in a close 5-4 decision, held that car dealership service advisors are exempt from the overtime requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). In reaching this conclusion, the court rejected the long-held belief that FLSA exemptions should be applied narrowly.

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By Audrie Howard, Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming, Lauren Harris, Camille Toney on February 8, 2018 at 2:50 PM

"2017" and "2018" written on metal wheelsThe federal employment law landscape saw some interesting developments in 2017, as well as some anticipated changes that were ultimately halted or delayed. Below is a summary of major federal employment law headlines and a look at what employers can expect in 2018.

For Missouri and Illinois employers specifically, a review of 2017 updates and a look forward at 2018 can be found here.

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By Audrie Howard, Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming, Lauren Harris, Camille Toney on February 8, 2018 at 2:50 PM

Missouri and Illinois highlighted in red on a map.Employers in Missouri and Illinois saw the passage of several new employment-related laws in 2017. Below is a look at some legislative highlights of 2017 and how they might affect your business in 2018.

Missouri employment laws

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By Katherine Fechte, Camille Toney on January 12, 2018 at 3:50 PM

Stack of envelopesOn January 5, 2018, the Department of Labor (DOL) Wage and Hour Division reissued 17 opinion letters to shed light on the DOL’s stance on numerous issues under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Under the administration of President George W. Bush, the DOL issued 36 opinion letters, many of which were recalled under President Barack Obama in early 2009. A year later in 2010, the Wage and Hour Division announced it would no longer issue opinion letters in response to employer and business questions about wage and hour issues under the FLSA.

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By Audrie Howard, Katherine Fechte on December 15, 2017 at 11:00 AM EST

Sign shows reverse directionThe National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) on Dec. 14, 2017, overturned significant prior precedent related to its position governing workplace policies and handbooks and its joint employer standard. These decisions are significant because they reversed two previous standards that had caused numerous headaches for employers.

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By Katherine Fechte on December 11, 2017 at 4:25 PM

Elevated view of a restaurant bill and money, showing a tip. The Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor (DOL) recently proposed a rule affecting tip regulations under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Under the rule proposed Dec. 4, 2017, establishments can implement tip pools, or require servers and workers who earn tips to share with those, such as line cooks and dishwashers, who do not.

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By Katherine Fechte on August 8, 2017 at 2:15 PM

Blue binder with the word "overtime" on the side, on top of a deskThe U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) published a request for information (RFI) in late July seeking comments, data, ideas and information on an appropriate salary level for exempt employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

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By Katherine Fechte on June 19, 2017 at 1:35 PM

Image of the Department of Justice (DOJ) buildingIn what is considered an “unprecedented action,” the Department of Justice (DOJ) has switched sides to argue on behalf of employers, and against the position of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), in the U.S. Supreme Court battle over employment agreements mandating arbitration. The DOJ said Friday that it no longer supports workers in the case NLRB v. Murphy Oil, which addresses whether an employment contract that requires the employee to waive his or her right to bring a class-action lawsuit against the employer violates the National Labor Relations Act.

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