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By Audrie Howard, Katherine Fechte on December 15, 2017 at 11:00 AM EST

Sign shows reverse directionThe National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) on Dec. 14, 2017, overturned significant prior precedent related to its position governing workplace policies and handbooks and its joint employer standard. These decisions are significant because they reversed two previous standards that had caused numerous headaches for employers.

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By Katherine Fechte on December 11, 2017 at 4:25 PM

Elevated view of a restaurant bill and money, showing a tip. The Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor (DOL) recently proposed a rule affecting tip regulations under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Under the rule proposed Dec. 4, 2017, establishments can implement tip pools, or require servers and workers who earn tips to share with those, such as line cooks and dishwashers, who do not.

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By Katherine Fechte on August 8, 2017 at 2:15 PM

Blue binder with the word "overtime" on the side, on top of a deskThe U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) published a request for information (RFI) in late July seeking comments, data, ideas and information on an appropriate salary level for exempt employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

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By Katherine Fechte on June 19, 2017 at 1:35 PM

Image of the Department of Justice (DOJ) buildingIn what is considered an “unprecedented action,” the Department of Justice (DOJ) has switched sides to argue on behalf of employers, and against the position of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), in the U.S. Supreme Court battle over employment agreements mandating arbitration. The DOJ said Friday that it no longer supports workers in the case NLRB v. Murphy Oil, which addresses whether an employment contract that requires the employee to waive his or her right to bring a class-action lawsuit against the employer violates the National Labor Relations Act.

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By Katherine Fechte on May 19, 2017 at 10:30 AM

Image of timesheet showing someone working more than eight hoursThis month, the House of Representatives passed by a vote of 229-197 the Republican-backed overtime bill titled the Working Families Flexibility Act. The act would enable employees to choose taking “comp time” or paid time off work instead of receiving overtime pay when they work more than 40 hours in a week. Proponents of the bill say this will provide increased flexibility for workers who want to spend more time with their families, but critics believe it will weaken federal overtime protections and make it easier for employers to delay paying earned overtime wages.

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By Katherine Fechte on March 3, 2017 at 3:52 PM

"Minimum Wage Increase Ahead" on street signThe Missouri Supreme Court on Feb. 28, 2017, upheld St. Louis’ minimum wage ordinance, over the arguments of business groups who claimed the ordinance was preempted by Missouri state law. The decision means the minimum wage in St. Louis will increase to $10 per hour this year and $11 in 2018.

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Business shoes moving from 2016 to 20172016 was a busy year for employment law developments on a national level, and 2017 promises to follow suit. To help employers navigate the changes, here is a summary of major developments that may affect your business this year.

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By Katherine Fechte on November 23, 2016 at 9:16 AM

Time and moneyThe uncertainty brewing over whether the U.S. Department of Labor’s new overtime rule would actually go into effect on Dec. 1, 2016, came to a halt on the afternoon of Nov. 22 when a Texas federal judge entered a nationwide injunction blocking the DOL from implementing its rule expanding overtime protections. 

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By Katherine Fechte on October 28, 2016 at 2:15 PM

What to know before Election Day in Missouri and Illinois

"I voted" stickerElection Day, Nov. 8, is almost here, and employers should be ready for the questions employees may have about taking time off to vote. Additionally, employers should make sure any company policies comply with state laws concerning time off for voting.

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By Katherine Fechte on September 29, 2016 at 11:54 AM

Businessman calling timeoutWith the Dec. 1, 2016, deadline for the Department of Labor (DOL) Final Overtime Rule approaching, employers across the country are urgently working to implement new compensation and classification practices. But recently, the DOL has been facing much criticism and resistance, as evidenced by a duo of federal lawsuits filed last week and a House vote to delay the rule’s implementation.

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