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New Rules signOn April 1, 2020, the Department of Labor released a temporary rule issuing regulations under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) effective immediately through December 31, 2020. Employers who have been wrestling with compliance with the FFCRA’s paid leave provisions will recognize much of the material in these regulations from the DOL’s informal guidance or from the CARES Act’s amendments to the FFCRA*. The regulations also include some helpful clarification:

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By Daniel Ritter on March 25, 2020 at 8:00 PM

FFCRA posterOn March 18, 2020, President Trump signed legislation extending to certain employees paid sick time related to COVID-19 and paid leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). As part of the legislation, employers must display the Department of Labor (DOL) poster notifying employees of their rights under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). On March 25, 2020, the DOL published two posters, for federal and non-federal employers.

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By Daniel Ritter on March 17, 2020 at 2:00 PM

Records fileOSHA requires that covered employers record certain work-related illnesses on their OSHA 300 log. On March 10, 2020, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) provided guidance on the recording of COVID-19. However, this guidance did not consider three key issues:

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By Daniel Ritter, Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming on January 22, 2020 at 10:15 AM

2020 review concept. Hand flip wood cube change year 2019 to 2020 and the word REVIEW on wooden block on wood tableThe theme for last year’s federal developments was reversal of Obama-era rules. The Department of Labor and National Labor Relations Board were especially active in this respect.

After a relatively quiet Supreme Court term for employment law in 2018-19, the stage is set for the court to rule in 2020 on highly anticipated topics. Below is a summary of major federal employment law headlines from last year and a look at what employers can expect in 2020.

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By Daniel Ritter, Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming on January 22, 2020 at 10:15 AM

Map showing Illinois and Missouri highlightedWhile Missouri employers saw few legislative updates that will affect the state of employment law in 2020, the Illinois legislature had a busy year. Below is a look at some of the legislative highlights of 2019 and how they might affect your business in 2020.

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By Daniel Ritter on January 2, 2020 at 2:15 PM

Cut out of marijuana leaf on a piece of white paperPreviously, we warned how the Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act (Cannabis Act) will directly impact Illinois employers’ responsibilities and liabilities when drug testing, disciplining or terminating employees because of the use or possession of cannabis.

Then, in December 2019, Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed amendments into the Cannabis Act. At first glance, it appears these amendments, Public Act 101-0593, are employer-friendly because they have relieved some of the tension between Illinois’ Right to Privacy in the Workplace Act (Right to Privacy Act) and the Cannabis Act. For example, under the amendments to the Cannabis Act, an employer may retract a job offer based on an applicant’s cannabis use before beginning employment.

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By Daniel Ritter on July 29, 2019 at 10:15 AM

"IL LEGAL" spelled out with wooden blocks, representing marijuana or weed being legalized in Illinois.Starting on Jan. 1, 2020, Illinois residents and visitors over age 21 are allowed to purchase, possess, use, or transport cannabis for recreational purposes. Illinois’ legalization of recreational cannabis under state law will impact Illinois and Missouri employers because the drug will be more accessible to their employees.

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By Daniel Ritter on June 11, 2019 at 9:40 AM

The word "update" spelled out with wooden blocksSince June 2010, contractors and subcontractors with contracts that result from federal agency solicitations issued on or after June 21, 2010, have been required to display the Department of Labor (DOL) poster notifying employees of their rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). On May 16, 2019, the DOL made the following updates to this employer-required poster:

  1. a new telephone number for the National Labor Relations Board; and
  2. new contact information for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.
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