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By Amy Blaisdell, Camille Toney on October 12, 2017 at 4:17 PM

Word "delay" written on a clockTaking a page from the fiduciary rule playbook, today the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) proposed a 90-day delay of the implementation of the amended ERISA claims procedure rule for employer-sponsored disability plans (“Final Rule”). The Final Rule was scheduled to take effect for ERISA disability benefits claims on January 1, 2018. The proposed delay would postpone the Final Rule’s application to April 1, 2018, giving the DOL time to decide whether to amend, modify or rescind the Final Rule.

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By Camille Toney on May 31, 2017 at 12:10 PM

Someone cutting money in half with scissorsOn May 12, 2017, the Missouri legislature passed a bill banning cities from adopting minimum wage rates higher than the state’s current rate of $7.70/hour. By pushing this bill through the House right before the end of the legislative session, Republican lawmakers sought to reverse St. Louis city’s new $10/hour minimum wage increase, which has been in effect since May 5.

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By Camille Toney on April 5, 2017 at 12:53 PM

Two arrows facing the left and one arrow facing the left.In a landmark decision released April 4, 2017, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Title VII protection extends to sexual orientation. The Seventh Circuit has become the first appeals court to rule in such a manner, directly contradicting the recent decisions of the Eleventh and Second Circuits.

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By Audrie Howard, Camille Toney, Lauren Harris on January 26, 2017 at 3:57 PM

Shoes moving from 2016 to 2017 with pictures of Illinois and MissouriThe Missouri and Illinois legislatures were quite active in 2016 in creating laws affecting employers, and they have been just as busy in the first few weeks of 2017. Below is a summary of employment law developments that may affect your business in those states in the coming year. 

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Business shoes moving from 2016 to 20172016 was a busy year for employment law developments on a national level, and 2017 promises to follow suit. To help employers navigate the changes, here is a summary of major developments that may affect your business this year.

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By Camille Toney on August 26, 2016

The Department of Justice recently released its final rule extending coverage of the ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA) to Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act. This final rule, which takes effect Oct. 11, 2016, updates those titles to include the ADAAA.

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By Camille Toney, Jill Luft on October 15, 2015 at 4:14 PM

Employers avoid higher wages for now, but the city is set to appeal the decision

Just hours before a St. Louis minimum wage ordinance was to take effect Oct. 15, St. Louis Circuit Judge Steven R. Ohmer struck it down. Ohmer determined that the city ordinance violates state law and declared it void and unenforceable.

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By Camille Toney, Molly Batsch on October 23, 2013 at 4:13 PM

BackgroundChecks The EEOC’s April 2012 Enforcement Guidance on employers’ use of criminal record screens has led many employers to question, or at least revisit, their background review procedures. This guidance not only urges employers to conduct “targeted” background screens (which consider the nature of each crime reported by prospective employees, the nature of the job in question, and the time elapsed after each crime reported), but further calls employers to engage in individualized assessments of those individuals screened out because of a background review.

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By Amy Blaisdell, Camille Toney on June 28, 2013 at 7:21 PM

Reassignment_LaborBlogLast month the United States Supreme Court refused to resolve the circuit split that has evolved over the issue of whether there is an affirmative duty under the Americans with Disabilities Act ("ADA") to accommodate a disabled individual through reassignment to another vacant job, without regard to whether there is a more qualified applicant for the same job. (The ADA prohibits employers with 15 or more employees from discriminating against individuals with disabilities and requires employers to engage in an interactive process with employees and applicants to determine whether there is a reasonable accommodation that will enable an employee to perform the job held or desired.)

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