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By T. Christopher Bailey on September 24, 2021 at 10:45 AM

In August 2021, Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed into law amendments to the Illinois Freedom to Work Act that will dramatically change the use of non-compete and non-solicitation agreements by Illinois employers. These amendments become effective January 1, 2022, and apply only to agreements entered into after that date.

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By Scott Cruz on July 30, 2021 at 11:00 AM

Time for ChangeThe Chicago City Council recently passed Ordinance No. 02021-2182 (the Ordinance), which, among other things, expands the permissible bases to take leave under the Chicago Paid Sick Leave Ordinance (PSLO) and creates new wage theft protections for employees. The paid sick leave amendments take effect on August 1, 2021, while the wage theft provisions went into effect on July 5, 2021.

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By Dennis Collins on July 21, 2021 at 3:45 PM

President Biden is committed to promoting labor organizing in an effort to strengthen union organizing after years of declining membership. In 2020, 10.8 percent of employees, including governmental employees, belonged to a union. In the 1950s, the total union membership exceeded 30 percent, including governmental employees. In 2020, the union membership in the private sector was 6.3 percent, whereas in 1983, the unions represented 23 percent of the employees in the private sector.

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By Thadford Felton on June 15, 2021 at 3:00 PM

The Illinois House and Senate have agreed on a version of the Illinois Freedom to Work Act, which is waiting for Governor Pritzker to sign into law. The Act puts restrictions on which employees can be subject to covenants not to compete and covenants not to solicit.

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By Scott Cruz on April 21, 2021 at 2:15 PM

A new Ordinance in the city of Chicago will prohibit Chicago employers from firing or disciplining workers who leave work to get a COVID-19 vaccine during the workers’ normally scheduled work hours. The Chicago City Council unanimously approved the Ordinance on April 21, 2021, and the Ordinance goes into effect immediately.

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By Scott Cruz on March 30, 2021 at 12:15 PM

On March 23, 2021, Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed into law Senate Bill 1480, the Employee Background Fairness Act. This impacts certain Illinois employers because it imposes new reporting and registration requirements concerning employee demographics and pay under the Illinois Business Corporation Act (IBCA) and the Illinois Equal Pay Act (IEPA), and creates new whistleblower anti-retaliation protections under the IEPA. The amendments take effect immediately.

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By Scott Cruz on March 25, 2021 at 4:15 PM

On March 23, 2021, Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed into law Senate Bill 1480, the Employee Background Fairness Act. This impacts Illinois employers because it imposes new obligations under the Illinois Human Rights Act (IHRA) on the way they can use criminal convictions to assess employment eligibility for applicants and current employees. It also imposes new reporting and registration requirements concerning employee demographics under the Illinois Business Corporation Act (IBCA) and the Illinois Equal Pay Act (IEPA) and creates new whistleblower anti-retaliation protections under the IEPA.

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By Scott Cruz on March 17, 2021 at 3:45 PM

On March 11, 2021, President Biden signed into law the American Rescue Plan Act (ARP). Among its many provisions, the ARP addresses paid sick and family leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), and payroll tax credits for providing such paid leave.

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By Caroline Paillou on March 2, 2021 at 2:30 PM

As many employers continue to deal with the prospect of a more remote workforce moving forward, what are the best practices related to restrictive covenants, information privacy, employee onboarding, and protecting trade secrets? Greensfelder attorneys Jim Ferrick, Jill Luft and Chris Pickett recently presented “Restrictive Covenants and Trade Secret Considerations for a Remote Workforce” for the St. Louis chapter of the Association for Corporate Counsel, covering steps to protect confidential business information. Here are nine key takeaways from their discussion.

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By Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming on January 8, 2021 at 12:30 PM

In a year marked by federal responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, federal agencies managed to finalize some non-pandemic legal developments in 2020: the Department of Labor’s (DOL) new overtime rule and joint employer test both went into effect, and the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) overturned a handful of Obama-era precedents. With Joe Biden’s election as president in November 2020, the coming four years will likely bring some reversal of the impact of the Trump administration, particularly on the DOL and NLRB. The 2019-2020 Supreme Court term was relatively busy for employment, including a major development for Title VII. Of course, much of the energy and resources of the federal agencies overseeing employment laws were spent on providing guidance to employers related to COVID-19 issues. Below is a summary of major federal employment law headlines from last year and a look at what employers can expect in 2021.

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