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February 10, 2020 at 3:00 PM

Image of interior of hospital showing empty hospital bedsIn an article titled “Quick tips for employers as coronavirus outbreak continues,” Greensfelder attorney Amy Blaisdell discusses the steps employers can take as a precaution when dealing with sick employees. From the article:

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By Daniel Ritter, Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming on January 22, 2020 at 10:15 AM

2020 review concept. Hand flip wood cube change year 2019 to 2020 and the word REVIEW on wooden block on wood tableThe theme for last year’s federal developments was reversal of Obama-era rules. The Department of Labor and National Labor Relations Board were especially active in this respect.

After a relatively quiet Supreme Court term for employment law in 2018-19, the stage is set for the court to rule in 2020 on highly anticipated topics. Below is a summary of major federal employment law headlines from last year and a look at what employers can expect in 2020.

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By Daniel Ritter, Katherine Fechte, Lauren Daming on January 22, 2020 at 10:15 AM

Map showing Illinois and Missouri highlightedWhile Missouri employers saw few legislative updates that will affect the state of employment law in 2020, the Illinois legislature had a busy year. Below is a look at some of the legislative highlights of 2019 and how they might affect your business in 2020.

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By Daniel Ritter on January 2, 2020 at 2:15 PM

Cut out of marijuana leaf on a piece of white paperPreviously, we warned how the Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act (Cannabis Act) will directly impact Illinois employers’ responsibilities and liabilities when drug testing, disciplining or terminating employees because of the use or possession of cannabis.

Then, in December 2019, Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed amendments into the Cannabis Act. At first glance, it appears these amendments, Public Act 101-0593, are employer-friendly because they have relieved some of the tension between Illinois’ Right to Privacy in the Workplace Act (Right to Privacy Act) and the Cannabis Act. For example, under the amendments to the Cannabis Act, an employer may retract a job offer based on an applicant’s cannabis use before beginning employment.

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By T. Christopher Bailey on December 30, 2019 at 4:30 PM

Moving from 2019 to 2020With the new year fast approaching, millions around the world will be gathering to count down the end of 2019 and usher in a new decade. As the ball drops in Times Square, employers should be asking themselves, “Are my exempt employees still subject to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) exemption?”

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By Lauren Daming on October 17, 2019 at 1:15 PM

Employer browsing employee dataFor months, companies doing business in California have awaited clarity on the final contours of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which goes into effect on Jan. 1, 2020. Some employer questions were recently answered when California Attorney General Xavier Becerra released proposed regulations for the CCPA and Gov. Gavin Newsom signed several CCPA amendments into law. One of those amendments, AB-25, exempts certain types of employee data from coverage under the CCPA.

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By Lauren Daming on September 24, 2019 at 3:00 PM

The word overtime is highlightedThe Department of Labor (DOL) announced its Final Rule updating the exemption threshold under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) on Sept. 24, 2019. The Final Rule raises the standard salary level threshold for “white collar” employees from the $23,660 minimum established in 2004 to $35,568, or $684 per week. Employees earning less than $35,568 a year must be paid overtime for hours worked in excess of 40 each week. Above this salary level, eligibility for overtime varies based on job duties.

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By Katherine Fechte on August 26, 2019 at 1:45 PM

Blue binder that says "policies" on itCan employers violate employees’ rights by creating policies that prohibit certain hairstyles at work? New York City and California think so; and they likely won’t be the last jurisdictions with a say on the matter.

Just this year the New York City Commission on Human Rights issued guidelines saying that while employers can require that employees maintain a work-appropriate appearance, a grooming policy that prohibits locs, cornrows, fades, Afros, and other such hairstyles will be considered racial bias. Specifically, the guidelines state:

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By T. Christopher Bailey on August 7, 2019 at 12:30 PM

Woman's arms protecting a drawing of money on a chalkboard from question marksUnder a new law set to take effect September 29, 2019, Illinois employers will be prohibited from, among other things, asking for an employee’s wage history during the hiring process. The law, which amends the Illinois Equal Pay Act, is designed with the intent of avoiding future pay disparity between men and women based on prior wage differences.

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By Daniel Ritter on July 29, 2019 at 10:15 AM

"IL LEGAL" spelled out with wooden blocks, representing marijuana or weed being legalized in Illinois.Starting on Jan. 1, 2020, Illinois residents and visitors over age 21 are allowed to purchase, possess, use, or transport cannabis for recreational purposes. Illinois’ legalization of recreational cannabis under state law will impact Illinois and Missouri employers because the drug will be more accessible to their employees.

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