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By Douglas Neville on March 26, 2019 at 1:20 PM

Words "Go Paperless" written on a key on a computer keyboardIn October 2018, the IRS updated the Employee Compliance Plans Resolution System (EPCRS) by issuing Rev. Proc. 2018-52. EPCRS is a program that allows plan sponsors to correct errors involving qualified plans (such as 401(k) plans, profit sharing plans, defined benefit pension plans, etc.) and certain other types of plans that, if left uncorrected, could jeopardize the tax-favored status of the plan. Among other changes to EPCRS, Rev. Proc. 2018-52 provides that, beginning Jan. 1, 2019, Voluntary Correction Program (VCP) submissions may be made electronically via www.pay.gov. Beginning April 1, 2019, the electronic filing requirement becomes mandatory.

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By Jeffrey Herman on January 30, 2019 at 1:40 PM

Image showing a wave of money with dollar bills and coinsConstruction companies with union employees often must make contributions to a defined benefit pension plan sponsored by the union. These plans are called “multiemployer” pension plans.

As a general rule, multiemployer plans are not well-funded. In 2015, for example, a federal study showed that 98.3 percent of multiemployer plans were underfunded. Collectively, that underfunding surpassed $560 billion. And nearly 40 percent of multiemployer plans are in the construction industry.

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By Heather Mehta on August 2, 2018 at 11:50 AM

Businessperson holding a white piece of paper that says "Lessons Learned."In April 2018, New York University was the first university to take to trial a case claiming it violated its ERISA fiduciary duties. And on July 31, 2018, it became the first university to win. Sacerdote v. New York Univ., No. 16-CV-6284 (KBF), 2018 WL 3629598 (S.D.N.Y. July 31, 2018).

More than a dozen lawsuits have been filed against prestigious colleges and universities claiming that they violated the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) in the operation of their Code Section 403(b) plans. Within the last year, University of Pennsylvania and Northwestern each won dismissal of their cases, and the University of Chicago settled its claims for $6.5 million. But NYU’s victory was the first to come after a trial, and the court’s finding of facts and conclusions of law provide lessons for ERISA fiduciaries — and not just those embroiled in their own fee cases.

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By Heather Mehta on July 26, 2018 at 2:50 PM

"Denied" spelled out with wooden blocksOn the same day the Ninth Circuit denied arbitration in Munro v. University of Southern California, a district also denied a motion to compel arbitration of a former employee’s ERISA breach of fiduciary duty and prohibited transaction claims in Brown v. Wilmington Trust, N.A., No. 3:17-cv-250 (S.D. OH July 24, 2018).

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By Heather Mehta on July 25, 2018 at 9:40 AM

Blank arbitration agreement with a red pen on topThe U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit affirmed a district court’s opinion that the University of Southern California could not compel arbitration of ERISA claims brought by its employees despite the fact that the parties entered into a broad arbitration agreement. Munro v. University of Southern California, No. 17-55550 (July 24, 2018). The reason? The agreement did not extend to claims brought on behalf of the employees’ retirement plan.

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By Daniel Schwartz on July 10, 2018 at 11:42 AM

"Pensions" written on a file tabAs discussed below, even though a church plan was operated in accordance with ERISA and the plan sponsor may have thought it was required to do so, as long as no 410(d) election was made, it is “no harm, no foul” for the plan’s status as a church plan.

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By Jeffrey Herman on July 9, 2018 at 9:45 AM

Businesspeople assembling papers to show a colorful umbrellaI previously examined the proposed rule by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) to expand so-called Association Health Plans, or AHPs, under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). In a nutshell, the proposed rule was designed to make it easier for employers to form a group in order to provide health benefits to their employees through an AHP. These new AHPs would have more freedom to restrict benefits in order to provide more affordable coverage.

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By Heather Mehta on June 11, 2018 at 10:10 AM

Man holding an empty walletIn an unpublished opinion, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit found a lower court did not err when awarding no relief for a breach of fiduciary duty. (Pender v. Bank of America Corp., No. 17-1485, June 5, 2018.) Although Bank of America violated the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA), the court found that it did not profit from its actions and, therefore, awarding damages would not be appropriate equitable relief.

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By Heather Mehta on May 30, 2018 at 1:25 PM

"403(b) Plan" on a piece of white paperNorthwestern University recently defeated a lawsuit alleging that it violated the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) while managing its retirement plans. The plaintiffs brought ERISA breach of fiduciary duty and prohibited transaction claims, alleging the university’s retirement plans featured imprudent investments and paid excessive fees. On May 25, 2018, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois dismissed the lawsuit in its entirety and denied the plaintiffs’ motion to amend to add additional counts, finding them futile.

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By Lauren Daming, Heather Mehta on May 21, 2018 at 2:45 PM EST

Supreme Court buildingIn a 5-4 decision written by newcomer Justice Gorsuch, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld employment agreements that require employees to individually arbitrate disputes with their employers.

The May 21, 2018, opinion in Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis resolves a trio of cases before the Supreme Court in which employees brought suits against their employers alleging state and federal wage and hour violations. In each situation, the employees had signed contracts agreeing to resolve any employment-related disputes in individualized arbitration. Nevertheless, they sought to litigate their claims in class or collective actions. 

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