Impact | Understanding and Managing Business Risk

Subscribe

Blog Editors

Topics

Archives

Posts in Court Rulings.
By Courtney Adair on March 7, 2018 at 9:10 AM

Word "blah blah blah" typed out onto a piece of paperAlmost all contracts contain “boilerplate” language. You may be tempted to skip over these provisions, assuming they are nothing more than unnecessary legalese. But a recent Seventh Circuit opinion, Engineered Abrasives, Inc. v. American Machine Products & Service, Inc., No. 17-1429, 2018 WL 828211 (7th Cir. Feb. 13, 2018), serves as a reminder to all contracting parties not to disregard any provisions of a contract, no matter how boilerplate, irrelevant, or inconsequential they may seem.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By Thadford Felton on November 1, 2017 at 9:10 AM

From the vantage point of someone on one side of a table, it shows a pen and paper with someone sitting on the other side of the table.An Illinois federal judge’s recent decision continues a trend toward supporting a “totality of the circumstances” approach to the enforcement of restrictive covenants.

In Stericycle, Inc. v. Simota, et al., 2017 WL 4742197, the defendants moved to dismiss plaintiff’s breach of contract claims arguing that 13 months of continued employment was inadequate consideration to enforce certain restrictive covenants. Following the majority of federal judges that have considered this issue in Illinois, Judge John J. Tharp found that if confronted with the issue, the Illinois Supreme Court would reject a bright line rule of two years of continued employment and apply a fact-specific approach in assessing consideration. Using this approach, Judge Tharp found that 13 months of continued employment was adequate consideration to support the enforcement of the restrictive covenants.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By Thadford Felton on June 8, 2016 at 1:49 PM

A recent decision from the Northern District of Illinois favors the “totality of circumstances” approach to evaluating the sufficiency of consideration necessary to support a restrictive covenant

Another judge from the Northern District of Illinois has thrown his hat into the ring in the debate over what is required to make a non-compete agreement enforceable in Illinois.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By David Goodman on April 6, 2016

Forming contracts by “clicking through” documents on the Internet is a fixture in the transaction of business today. However, as recently recognized in Sgouros v. TransUnion, a late March 2016 Seventh Circuit decision, despite the ubiquity of contracting online, “the law governing the formation of contracts on the Internet is still in the early stages of development.”

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By Thadford Felton on March 22, 2016 at 10:51 AM

In Deere Employees Credit Union v. Smith, an Illinois court recently refused to enforce a restrictive covenant in an employment agreement, finding that it was overly broad. Reference to the terms of that agreement and the court’s finding offer reminders of traps to be mindful of in drafting restrictive covenants, as well as in evaluating restrictions and exposure presented by potential new hires. 

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By David Goodman on March 16, 2016 at 2:10 PM

The “bright line” rule for the adequacy of non-compete agreements in Illinois first announced in Fifield v. Premier Dealer Servs., Inc., just became a bit hazier for parties evaluating the enforceability of their restrictive covenants.

Last week, a federal district court judge applying Illinois law declined to void a non-compete agreement on the basis that the at-will employment relationship that was the consideration for the restrictive covenant lasted less than two years. Adopting the reasoning of three of the four federal court judges in the Northern District of Illinois that have addressed the issue, the court, in R.J. O’Brien & Associates v. Williamson,1 concluded that the Illinois Supreme Court would reject a two-year bright line rule for the adequacy of consideration required for a non-compete agreement to be enforceable.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email
By Courtney Adair on March 2, 2016 at 10:57 AM

employers need to act quickly A recent decision from the Illinois Appellate Court for the First District reminds employers of the need to act quickly and thoroughly in investigating potential breaches of employee restrictive covenants and in taking actions to enforce their rights under those agreements.

In Bridgeview Bank Group v. Meyer, 2016 IL App (1st) 160042, the court affirmed the trial court’s denial of an employer’s petition for a temporary restraining order against a former employee. Bridgeview Bank had employed Thomas Meyer as a senior vice president. The bank entered into an employment agreement incorporating non-compete, non-solicitation and non-disclosure provisions at the beginning of the employment relationship. 

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Email