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By Katherine Fechte, T. Christopher Bailey on September 23, 2015 at 11:14 AM

The National Labor Relations Board has long held employers cannot stifle employee communications about the conditions of their employment in general handbook confidentiality clauses, but on Aug. 27, the NLRB took that prohibition one step further.

In a 2-1 decision, the board ruled The Boeing Co.’s confidentiality restriction for employees under HR investigations violated the National Labor Relations Act. (Boeing Co., 2015 BL 278958, 362 N.L.R.B. No. 195, 8/27/15.)

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By Lauren Daming, Lauren Harris on September 9, 2015 at 9:49 AM

Whether it’s using a company laptop at home or accessing social media and other personal sites via an office desktop computer, the lines between an employee’s personal and work lives are increasingly blurred.

A businessman is holding the document from inside computer's screen.As revealed by the recent Ashley Madison website hack, many employees across the United States use business computers and business email accounts for very personal reasons — reportedly over 15,000 email addresses used to register accounts were linked to government or military servers. However, dealing with an employee who “cheats” on an employer’s computer, Internet or email use policy may not be as simple as it seems.

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By Marcus Wilbers on January 8, 2014 at 10:33 AM

Employee Handbook XSmallOn this blog, we have previously written about employee handbooks and arbitration clauses in the employment setting. However, the Missouri Court of Appeals recently weighed in on what happens when you combine the two by inserting an arbitration clause in an employee handbook. The results were not good for the employer.

There are two schools of thought on employee handbooks. The kitchen sink approach is to throw in everything that could be useful and defer the decision on actually enforcing particular provisions until the need arises. Arbitration clauses often fall in that category. The other – and better – view is to treat the handbook as a guiding document that sets rules not only for the employees but the employer as well.

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By Marcus Wilbers on May 29, 2013 at 2:18 PM

Employee Handbook“We're all throwing the dice, playing the game, moving our pieces around the board, but if there is a problem the lawyer is the only person who has read the inside of the top of the box.” – Jerry Seinfeld

Employers often find it difficult to set and manage their expectations for employees. Like playing a board game, however, managing employees is markedly easier and purposeful when the rules are clear, widely read and consistently followed. Workplaces, like board games, operate smoother and more efficiently when everyone is aware of and familiar with the rules. And, like board games, people are best served to read the rules before beginning.

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