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By Lauren Daming on February 21, 2017 at 1:25 PM

Image of St. Louis, Missouri City HallA St. Louis city ordinance took effect Feb. 13 protecting employees against discrimination on the basis of their “reproductive health decisions.” Ordinance 70459 prohibits employers from taking any adverse employment action — such as termination or demotion — against an employee due to the employee’s decision to use drugs, devices or medical services related to reproductive health that the employer does not agree with, including contraceptives, fertility treatments or abortion.

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By Audrie Howard on February 6, 2017 at 10:13 AM

States highlighted in green with right-to-work legislationMissouri has become the 28th state to enact right-to-work legislation banning mandatory union dues. Gov. Eric Greitens signed the bill into law on Feb. 6, 2017, and it will take effect on Aug. 28, 2017.

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By Lauren Daming on January 30, 2017 at 9:53 AM

People joining in tug of war.Last week, 60 business groups and four states joined the fight against the Department of Labor’s new overtime rule by filing amicus briefs in the Fifth Circuit asking the court to uphold the district court’s injunction blocking the rule from taking effect.

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By Audrie Howard, Camille Toney, Lauren Harris on January 26, 2017 at 3:57 PM

Shoes moving from 2016 to 2017 with pictures of Illinois and MissouriThe Missouri and Illinois legislatures were quite active in 2016 in creating laws affecting employers, and they have been just as busy in the first few weeks of 2017. Below is a summary of employment law developments that may affect your business in those states in the coming year. 

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Business shoes moving from 2016 to 20172016 was a busy year for employment law developments on a national level, and 2017 promises to follow suit. To help employers navigate the changes, here is a summary of major developments that may affect your business this year.

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By Amy Blaisdell, Heather Mehta on January 18, 2017 at 3:40 PM

Supreme Court buildingThe U.S. Supreme Court on Jan. 17 ended a yearlong legal challenge to the enforceability of a forum selection clause in an ERISA-governed benefit plan, when the court denied the plaintiff’s petition for writ of certiorari. The case is Clause v. U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri, 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 719 (Jan. 17, 2017).

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By Audrie Howard on January 3, 2017 at 1:20 PM

Documents coming out of computer screenEmployers should be on notice that the Department of Homeland Security has published a new edition of the Form I-9 for use beginning no later than Jan. 22, 2017.

The new Form I-9 should be used to verify identity and employment authorization for all new hires and re-verifications of expired documents. It is available in a fillable PDF here and in paper form here.

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By Katherine Fechte on November 23, 2016 at 9:16 AM

Time and moneyThe uncertainty brewing over whether the U.S. Department of Labor’s new overtime rule would actually go into effect on Dec. 1, 2016, came to a halt on the afternoon of Nov. 22 when a Texas federal judge entered a nationwide injunction blocking the DOL from implementing its rule expanding overtime protections. 

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By Kevin McLaughlin on November 18, 2016 at 11:27 AM

Union demonstrationA federal judge’s decision to block the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) from enforcing its new persuader rule means employers may continue hiring legal counsel on unionization issues without facing an argument from the DOL that fees paid to legal counsel must be publicly disclosed.

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By Audrie Howard on November 17, 2016 at 3:48 PM

time and clocksAs employers are all aware, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL)’s new overtime rules are set to take effect Dec. 1, 2016. The rule, projected to cover some 4.2 million workers, will raise the minimum salary threshold for overtime exemption 101 percent from its current rate of $455 per week to $913 per week.

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