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By Katherine Fechte on November 23, 2016 at 9:16 AM

Time and moneyThe uncertainty brewing over whether the U.S. Department of Labor’s new overtime rule would actually go into effect on Dec. 1, 2016, came to a halt on the afternoon of Nov. 22 when a Texas federal judge entered a nationwide injunction blocking the DOL from implementing its rule expanding overtime protections. 

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By Kevin McLaughlin on November 18, 2016 at 11:27 AM

Union demonstrationA federal judge’s decision to block the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) from enforcing its new persuader rule means employers may continue hiring legal counsel on unionization issues without facing an argument from the DOL that fees paid to legal counsel must be publicly disclosed.

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By Audrie Howard on November 17, 2016 at 3:48 PM

time and clocksAs employers are all aware, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL)’s new overtime rules are set to take effect Dec. 1, 2016. The rule, projected to cover some 4.2 million workers, will raise the minimum salary threshold for overtime exemption 101 percent from its current rate of $455 per week to $913 per week.

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By Katherine Fechte on October 28, 2016 at 2:15 PM

What to know before Election Day in Missouri and Illinois

"I voted" stickerElection Day, Nov. 8, is almost here, and employers should be ready for the questions employees may have about taking time off to vote. Additionally, employers should make sure any company policies comply with state laws concerning time off for voting.

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By Katherine Fechte on September 29, 2016 at 11:54 AM

Businessman calling timeoutWith the Dec. 1, 2016, deadline for the Department of Labor (DOL) Final Overtime Rule approaching, employers across the country are urgently working to implement new compensation and classification practices. But recently, the DOL has been facing much criticism and resistance, as evidenced by a duo of federal lawsuits filed last week and a House vote to delay the rule’s implementation.

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By Katherine Fechte on September 22, 2016 at 9:30 AM

States involved in DOL lawsuitTwenty-one states have filed suit against the federal government seeking a preliminary and permanent injunction to block the Department of Labor’s new overtime rule and declare it unlawful.

In the 30-page complaint filed Sept. 20, 2016, the states allege that the Obama administration is trying to impose heavy costs and its own policy initiatives, in violation of the 10th Amendment to the Constitution. On March 13, 2014, President Barack Obama ordered the DOL to revise the Fair Labor Standards Act’s overtime exemption to account for the federal minimum wage. The DOL complied and released its final rule on May 18, 2016. 

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By Camille Toney on August 26, 2016

The Department of Justice recently released its final rule extending coverage of the ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA) to Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act. This final rule, which takes effect Oct. 11, 2016, updates those titles to include the ADAAA.

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By Katherine Fechte on August 10, 2016 at 11:20 AM

Instead of taking effect Aug. 10, OSHA anti-retaliation provisions impacting post-accident drug-testing policies are now deferred until Nov. 1.The enforcement of anti-retaliation provisions in new injury and illness reporting regulations for employers has been delayed until Nov. 1, 2016.

On May 11, 2016, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published the final rule revising its regulations on the recording and reporting of occupational injuries and illnesses. The final regulations, which require employers to electronically submit information about workplace injuries and illnesses, also bar employers from retaliating against workers for reporting such incidents.

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By Katherine Fechte on August 8, 2016 at 1:25 PM

“Married on Saturday … fired on Monday”: Seventh Circuit holds Title VII doesn’t protect against sexual orientation biasOn July 28, 2016, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit ruled in a precedential decision that existing civil rights laws do not protect against sexual orientation discrimination. Although it was a unanimous decision, the court expressed great displeasure and conflict with the “illogical” legal structure in which “a person can be married on Saturday and then fired on Monday for just that act.”

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By Lauren Daming on June 22, 2016 at 2:15 PM

Following new rules issued on employer wellness programs, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on June 16 released an example of how employers should communicate with their employees about the medical information those programs obtain.

In May, the EEOC issued final rules clarifying that Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) allow employers to use incentives to encourage participation in wellness programs that include disability-related inquiries and/or medical examinations as long as the programs are voluntary and the incentives do not exceed certain limits. Now, the EEOC has provided an example of how employers that offer these wellness programs may notify their employees about the specifics.

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